Best Business Schools in Nebraska

Also known as School of Business, a Business School is an education institution that offers bachelor or graduate degrees in management or business administration. This page lists all accredited business schools in Nebraska that provide full-time or part-time graduate business education leading to an MBA (Master of Business Administration) degree.

  • All Counties in Nebraska: Alphabetical list of all counties, boroughs and parishes in the state of Nebraska. Offered by Countryaah.

Creighton University (NE)
College of Business Administration
2500 California Plaza Omaha, NE 68178-0130
Admissions Phone: (402) 280-2841
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www2.creighton.edu/business/
Electronic application: http://www.applyweb.com/apply/cubusiness

University of Nebraska–Lincoln (NE)
College of Business Administration
12th and R Streets Lincoln, NE 68588-0405
Admissions Phone: (402) 472-2338
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.mba.unl.edu
Electronic application: http://www.unl.edu/gradstudies/

University of Nebraska–Omaha (NE)
College of Business Administration
6001 Dodge Street Omaha, NE 68182-0048
Admissions Phone: (402) 554-2303
Admissions E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://cba.unomaha.edu/mba
Electronic application: http://www.ses.unomaha.edu/admissions/

Nebraska – State information

State name Nebraska
State nickname Cornhusker State
Capital Lincoln
Largest city Omaha
Area 200 330 km 2
Population 1 868 516
Joined the Union March 1, 1867
The biggest cities Lincoln
Natural attractions Platte and Missouri rivers
Main industries food industry, engineering, chemistry

Nebraska, located in the heart of the prairie area, is not only an important agricultural state, but also important for the union of East and West.

In 1682 it was occupied by the French, in 1803 the United States gained the state of Nebraska. American travelers soon set out against Missouri, paving the way for fur traders. In the 1840s, the Platte Valley became a gateway to the west for thousands of pioneers. The railroad builders soon recognized that Nebraska had great agricultural potential, and as early as 1869 the Pacific Railway ran the country.

After joining the Union, Nebraska’s population grew, pushing the Indians further west. Agriculture was hit by the crisis in the 1990s, and it flourished again in the early 20th century to be decimated during the Great Depression of 1929-33. It mainly produces corn, wheat, legumes and meat. Oil extraction and fertilizer production are important. Platte Valley has retained its historic significance of the US communications and arteries.

Business Schools in Nebraska